Employee and Faculty Awards Ceremony

Written by Matt Cunningham

Photos by Lindsey Brand

The employee and faculty awards ceremony was an event to honor excellence in the various fields of work that are present at FRCC. From Employee Excellence Awards to Master Teacher Awards, the event featured a wide variety of faculty and staff receiving award nominations or victories.

 

Written by Matt Cunningham

Photos by Lindsey Brand

The employee and faculty awards ceremony was an event to honor excellence in the various fields of work that are present at FRCC. From Employee Excellence Awards to Master Teacher Awards, the event featured a wide variety of faculty and staff receiving award nominations or victories.

The event was held in the Rotunda by the cafeteria.  There was cloth on the tables, and the area was blocked off once the ceremony began. The event is held every year; all members nominated are chosen by the students.

 

Employee Excellence Awards winners:

Rosa Cruz

John Gunderson

Susan McMurdo

Janet Murphy

Patrick O’Neill

 

Outstanding Department Award Winner:

TRIO Upward Bound

 

Vice President’s Outstanding Contribution Awards winners:

Sheena Martin

Rita Quintana

 

Teaching Excellence Awards Winners:

Rita Quintana

Mary Mattson

Jim Voss

Guadalupe Chavez

Jomil Ebro

Richard Ortner

 

Master Teacher Awards Winners:

Ann Riedl

Kathleen Hammond  

FRCC Cancels All Remaining Finals Due to Avalanche and Nuggets Playoff Runs

Written by Matt Cunningham

The stress of finals week can take a toll on many students. However, FRCC has officially cancelled all finals during the finals week due to the playoff runs by the Colorado Avalanche and the Denver Nuggets.

Written by Matt Cunningham

The stress of finals week can take a toll on many students. However, FRCC has officially cancelled all finals during the finals week due to the playoff runs by the Colorado Avalanche and the Denver Nuggets.

The school felt it was way too overwhelming to have to cope with the Avalanche’s playoff elimination, watch the Nuggets’ playoff games, and study for finals simultaneously.

“Obviously this is more important than any test I may have taken this week.” said Andy Anderson, student of FRCC.  

The hype surrounding the Nuggets is so extreme that it has caused recent lectures to be centered around basketball theory. Some instructors are even offering extra credit if students write a report on the greatness of the Avalanche’s Nathan MacKinnon or the Nuggets’ Nikola Jokic.

“I decided to offer extra credit on something even more important.” said Freddy Fredrickson, instructor of Crazy Calculus 330 at FRCC. “If a student sends me a picture of them attending either a Nuggets or Avalanche playoff game, they automatically get an A in my class.”

Students are still dealing with the aftermath of the Avalanche’s heartbreaking game 7 loss in San Jose.

“I would not be able to take a final with my emotional state.” said Jack Daniels, student of FRCC. “As soon as the game clock hit triple zeroes, I had to immediately pick myself up, dust myself off, and focus on the team that is still alive: the Nuggets.”

Regardless if the Nuggets win or lose their game 7 on Sunday, all remaining finals at FRCC will be cancelled.

Clearly the importance of these two teams postseason runs are sweeping the entire state, even at an educational level.  With no finals, students now have the full capability to do what is important, watch playoff basketball and hockey.

Front Page Disclosure Notice

The following articles are purely satire, parody, facetious, and in no way represent the views, beliefs, or stance of the Front Page Student Newspaper on the Westminster Campus of Front Range Community College. They were written purely in good faith with no intention to negatively impact and or harm any one person, organization, company, conglomerate, or group of individuals.

They were simply created for the sake of humor and stress relief after the final week of the spring semester. None of the following events listed happened on any campus, was not passed by any administration or directors board, and was not in any way suggested or mentioned in a professional setting.

The Front Page Student Newspaper is not in any way responsible for any resulting misunderstanding, misinterpretation, or misinformed belief of the article’s contents.

 

Front Range Community College is not in any way responsible for any resulting misunderstanding, misinterpretation, or misinformed belief of the article’s contents.

 

Westminster Campus Administration and Directors Board is not in any way responsible for any resulting misunderstanding, misinterpretation, or misinformed belief of the article’s contents.

Feeding Hungry Students: The Kitchen Table at FRCC

Written by Matt Cunningham

Do you have a consistently reliable knowledge of where your next meal is coming from? Some FRCC students do not have certainty when it comes to their next meal.

According to Sociology Club advisor Kristina Kahl, “I could go into any class and easily say that half the students are food insecure.”

Written by Matt Cunningham

 

Do you have a consistently reliable knowledge of where your next meal is coming from? Some FRCC students do not have certainty when it comes to their next meal.

According to Sociology Club advisor Kristina Kahl, “I could go into any class and easily say that half the students are food insecure.”

This is why Kahl says she feels so passionate about FRCC’s new weekly project, the Kitchen Table.  

The Kitchen Table is a program run by Kahl, Veteran Services Advisor Jeramey Reamer, and Veterans Club officer Tonya Harris. Each Tuesday from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., the kitchen table will provide free food to students in the Rotunda near the school’s cafeteria. The food is donated by Whole Foods and features Lamar’s Donuts and is available to students in the aforementioned time frame, or until it runs out: whichever comes first.

Each Tuesday that the kitchen table is held, it is open to volunteers to help make the process run smoothly. The kitchen table’s goal is to be held more than once a week so that students can have reliable meals each day of the week.

“A lack of volunteers is what prevents us from going multiple days of the week,” said Kahl.

If more students volunteered to help out the Kitchen Table, it would be able to go multiple days a week.

“When students volunteer, it’s a great opportunity for resumes and [experience],” said Kahl. “It shows [you] are going above and beyond.”

Students can sign up for volunteering for the Kitchen Table by contacting Reamer, Harris, or Khal. Reamer specializes in helping out veterans on campus. He said his motives for being involved with the kitchen table are helping the veterans get something that they definitely deserve.

“Food and housing are the biggest [cost] problems for veterans,” said Reamer.

It wasn’t an easy task to get the kitchen table up and running.  The school had to approve the table being used near the Rotunda and Student Life.

“Getting this project off the ground was the biggest challenge,” said Harris. “However, it is now a smooth process every Tuesday. This has all taken form miraculously, but we still have to deal with negative social media comments, [such as ‘get a job’ and ‘manage your money better’] which will be [our] biggest challenge moving forward.”

The kitchen table wants to accomplish more goals in the future, They aspire to provide each FRCC student who is food insecure with a reliable meal.

“Our whole goal is twofold: taking care of students who are hungry and taking care of the moment, rather than worrying about the past or the future,” said Kahl. “We want a fridge with an ice maker. We also want to raise student awareness about the food pantry, so that more [people] are fed that may not be able to afford it.”

While all of the goods are donated by Whole Foods and Lamar’s Donuts, Kahl, Reamer, and Harris all would love support from the school in any shape or form; it doesn’t have to be money.

“It would be nice to have food provided by the school.” said Harris. “Whole Foods provides a decent amount, but it goes fast.  The school helping out would help out even more students who show up towards the end of our hours.”

As the kitchen table continues to feed FRCC students every Tuesday, they still have plenty of future goals and will continue to attempt to find new and better ways to make their project as helpful for the students as possible.

Weatherman, Broadcast Journalist, and Teacher; Richard Ortner Feature

Written by Matt Cunningham

From being a weatherman on Denver7 news on ABC to being a public speaking instructor at FRCC, Richard Ortner has had numerous jobs and life experience that he enjoys to bring to each class that he teaches. Ortner is a Colorado native and has been teaching public speaking for about ten years. He has a master’s degree in both journalism and broadcast meteorology.

Written by Matt Cunningham

Photo by Ezra Ekman

From being a weatherman on Denver7 News to being a public speaking instructor at FRCC, Richard Ortner has had numerous jobs and life experiences that he enjoys bringing to each class that he teaches. Ortner is a Colorado native and has been teaching public speaking for about 10 years. He has a master’s degree in both journalism and broadcast meteorology. Ortner also recently won the Teaching Excellence Award at FRCC.

“At other colleges, I’ve taught weather reporting, broadcasting, video editing, advanced television production, broadcast writing, social media for news, electronic media, and much more,” said Ortner.

This wealth of experience is what Ortner says helps him bring “Real-life experience to [his] classes to make them relevant for students.”

He used his broadcasting degree to get a job at Denver7 News as a television editor. This was his first job at a broadcasting outlet. His career there lasted for 10 years before he moved on to FOX31 Denver news for two years.

“My favorite personal interview was interviewing [the actor] John Leguizamo,” said Ortner. “It was a fall-down funny interview, and it was so on the edge, that I thought I might be fired when it aired.”

Some notable stories that Ortner has covered include the 2008 Democratic Convention, several weather disasters, and interviews with various scientists. These were all during his job as a multimedia journalist. Ortner moved on from that and ended up becoming a broadcast meteorologist.

“I did this because I thought I had found my passion in life.” said Ortner  

“The most rewarding part of that job was bringing science to people,” said Ortner. “I think we have a science problem in this country, and bringing science to them felt extremely important.”

Ortner’s favorite story that he covered while being a broadcast meteorologist involved two women in an avalanche.

“There were two young ladies that got caught in an avalanche,” said Ortner. “Just based on watching a show on Discovery Channel, they built a fort to weather the storm with just ChapStick and snow to survive on.”

Ortner’s most memorable from being a meteorologist at the news station was his experience with the Overview Effect, a cognitive shift that astronauts experience when looking back at the Earth in outer space. When Ortner viewed the satellite images, he said it was “fascinating to see how small we are compared to the world.”

Ortner’s wealth of experience in the workforce and in life has created philosophies on life that he believed would help students in his public speaking class.

“I try to bring real-life experience, as well as academics, to my class,” said Ortner. “I think we can teach students how to bring these skills to life. If you can bring public speaking skills to everyday life, you will be much better off.”

The fear of public speaking tends to hold quite a bit of people back, but mastering those skills can be essential, according to Ortner. He has spoken in front of large crowds of up to a couple thousand people.

“The first time you walk into a room with a large crowd to speak, it’s an O.M.G. moment,” said Ortner.

His hilosophies on ‘the big picture’ have formed from his previous experiences as well.

“At any given moment, anyone you meet is probably going through some [emotional] stuff, whether it’s minor or major,” said Ortner. “We need to keep in mind that we are in this together.”

“When I was 23, my mom died. It hit me hard, and the outside world doesn’t necessarily see that. When I was 29, my daughter died. I put on a happy face for people, but I was truly hurting deep down. We have to remember to stay true to yourself, and chill out, and treat each other with respect.”

Ortner discussed the lessons he learned in college and why he feels it is so important. While Ortner claimed he has lost a lot of what he learned in college, he had one project stick with him. The project involved a heavy emphasis on using teamwork.

“My group was the one that was supposed to cooperate,” said Ortner. “We were the most diverse group, whereas other groups were homogeneous. Our group out-performed every other group, because we had the best sense of cooperation. Through our diversity we bring out our biggest strengths.”

Ortner has had a variety of jobs and has a wealth of advice to give to aspiring students in all fields.  He attempts to make his classes as relevant as possible, as he frequently said; “You have to practice what you preach.”

Ortner’s path to becoming an instructor at a community college may be unconventional, but he has used it for benefit in both his professional and personal life; he hopes to continue to use his variety of career experience in the classroom to benefit his students.