Main Street Cafe Review

Written by Sulema Lopez

Illustration by Madison Otten

Living in a small town like Brighton doesn’t leave many options for decent non-chain restaurants. Finding a good restaurant with home style cooking usually requires venturing into the ‘big city.’ Main Street Café has filled that gap with delicious home style breakfast and lunch options. With Google Reviews of 4.5 out of 5 stars speaking for the quality of the restaurant, you can’t pass on the opportunity to stop in the next time you’re in Brighton.

Written by Sulema Lopez

Illustration by Madison Otten

Living in a small town like Brighton doesn’t leave many options for decent non-chain restaurants. Finding a good restaurant with home style cooking usually requires venturing into the ‘big city.’ Main Street Café has filled that gap with delicious home style breakfast and lunch options. With Google Reviews of 4.5 out of 5 stars speaking for the quality of the restaurant, you can’t pass on the opportunity to stop in the next time you’re in Brighton.

This small-town café, at first sight, left me suspicious of the quality of restaurant it could be, considering their lacking curb-side appeal. Being in one of the older brick buildings on Main Street and with a simple sunrise sign, it gave a type of old-timer vibe and the feeling that I would be dining with the Brighton Senior Center. I would find out that was not the case. Inside the small establishment, there is fresh paint and new modern flooring, along with modern light fixtures and chalkboard signs, which I may add has some amazing artwork.

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and therefore, I believe, requires a focused menu. Main Street Café delivers, with a small but traditional breakfast menu, from egg dishes, skillets, omelets, pancakes, waffles, French toast, and crepes. They also have two of my favorites included: chicken-fried steak and biscuits and gravy. Now if you’ve had a skillet at, let’s say, Village Inn before, I can say the skillets at Main Street Café blow them out of the water in flavor and portion size. Another thing that sets this small café’s menu apart is their option of fresh-squeezed orange juice, which you can purchase either by the glass or liter.

Main Street Café does not believe in small portions. At each visit, I was blown away with the portion sizes. When ordering the chicken-fried steak, the plate is like getting served on a small frying pan, loaded with home-style potatoes, diced chicken-fried steak, and topped with two eggs cooked to your liking. The spinach and bacon omelet stuns again with the portion size, looking like a six-egg omelet and loaded with home style potatoes.

The kid’s menu also does not come small. The mini pancake breakfast has nothing mini about it; the pancakes were easily adult size, and it comes with three of them. They also add what looked like two scrambled eggs and a sausage link. Another kid’s menu item is the smiley face breakfast; it looked like a Mickey Mouse silhouette with whip cream eyes and smile, one egg, and one sausage link. This pancake was also big enough to be an adult portion. In fairness, the kids French toast was an appropriate child-size meal. I came to a conclusion that, maybe, they just don’t do small pancakes.

After visiting Main Street Café a couple of times with a total of four people (two adults, two kids), I can say that they portion their food big but make their bills small. Each time, we had more than enough food, great service, and amazing taste. With my amazement that, each time, our totals were under $30. You cannot beat great quality for a low price.

My final grade for Main Street Café is an A. The small diner experience and modern indoor décor makes up for the simple and old-time curb side appeal. The quality of their food and good service make for a pleasant experience every time. I do recommend, however, as this spot has become popular with the locals, that you try to get in early to avoid a long wait in their extremely small waiting space.

Main Street Café

Location: 161 N Main St. Brighton, CO 80601

Hours: Mon-Sun 6 a.m.-2 p.m.

Cuisine: American/Tex Mex Breakfast and Lunch

Contact Info: (303) 278-7939

Overall Evaluation: A

The Gospel of Eureka: Movie Review

Written by Drew Lascot

“What happens when an unstoppable force meets an immovable object?”

In many ways, this classic paradox is the crux of Michael Palmieri and Donal Mosher’s barrier-obliterating documentary, The Gospel of Eureka; a showcase of an oddball abode of the Ozark– Eureka Springs, Arkansas.

Written by Drew Lascot

“What happens when an unstoppable force meets an immovable object?”

In many ways, this classic paradox is the crux of Michael Palmieri and Donal Mosher’s barrier-obliterating documentary, The Gospel of Eureka; a showcase of an oddball abode of the Ozark– Eureka Springs, Arkansas.

Something felt different watching Eureka versus other documentaries. It was meandering, feeling less like it was trying to accomplish an objective or flip a switch in the audience’s brain and more like a showcase of a place and the people and their happenings within. This may not sound like it would be very attention-grabbing to start or ultimately very satisfying, but its hands-off approach only does better at being serviceably emotional. Not to mention, the happenings inside this small town are far from typical.

In Eureka Springs, you’ll only find around 2,000 people. It’s an expectedly immovable community of Christians and hosts of “The Great Passion Play”– a lavish live depiction of the life and death of Jesus Christ put on ever since 1968. The show uses over 100 actors (as well as several real sheep, camels, and other appropriate creatures), and all takes place in a 550-foot, on-stage, multi-leveled replica of Jerusalem. There’s even a cave for the actor portraying Jesus to emerge from, complete with genuine bathroom and makeup mirror. In the nearby trees, atop Magnetic Mountain, stands Christ of the Ozarks, the largest statue of Jesus erected in the United States.

Back downtown, in bars across the main thoroughfare, drag shows have become a popular form of entertainment. See, although Eureka Springs may also be hosts to and have the veneer of traditional or conservative values, they don’t see any reason to ditch immovable faith in the face of unstoppable social change. Instead, the seemingly unshakable forces find unity together. Two men, long married to each other, and a late-aged transgender woman married to a cis man all give their own perspectives on this clash of lifestyle and faith, or lack thereof. One gentleman sums things up succinctly but brashly:

“Just because you’re a Christian doesn’t really [sic] have anything to do with who you’re fucking; it has to do with who you’re loving.”

If that line caught you off-guard in a good way, expect to be rolling in your chair throughout your time in Eureka. Sometimes you’ll be laughing with what’s happening, other times you might be cackling in confusion, but it’s important to stress that everything is handled in great humor. Juxtaposing cuts between the Great Passion Play and drag shows does well in highlighting the absurdity of both scenes and keeps things entertaining.

Surprisingly, the most political the movie ever gets is its referring back to the looming Senate Bill 202 in Arkansas, what had been called a ‘road map’ to anti-gay discrimination. The Eureka Springs City Council responded by approving an ordinance against the discrimination of people based on sexual orientation or gender identity and putting the issue to vote in the public. It’s an interesting action taken in a state far enough the other way to propose the bill in the first place.

As much as I appreciated Eureka’s almost paceless approach to documentary film making, sometimes it introduces threads I wish got embellished on, and with a measly 75-minute run time, I felt like my main course was taken from me early with no dessert. Perhaps extra interview footage and more will be added in the DVD release this April, but it still feels like more could have made the final cut of the movie. (To Blu-ray elitists like me: there are currently no plans on HD copies at this time)

Seeing Eureka in a theater may be near impossible at this time, as it was screened at the SIE Film Center. For those unfamiliar, these movies tend to only be in town for a weekend or two before they’re gone, due to their independent nature. But to those interested, seek this one out through any means you can. I’ve personally put in a request at Jeffco Libraries for them to keep a copy in their catalogue, I recommend doing the same to increase all of our chances, and spread the gospel!

Pho TJ Restaurant Review

Written by Ana Canas McPeek

There are so many restaurants out there, but where to eat? If you’re a food lover like me and love to try different cuisine, you might consider this low-key Vietnamese restaurant, Pho TJ, located in Brighton on Bridge Street. Open for more than five years with 4.7 star average on Google reviews, this pho noodle restaurant is a place for workers around the area like me who want to get a quick lunch. You will be guaranteed an experience with good food and awesome service. We all have our reasons why we return to a restaurant, and I have 4 criteria that you won’t want to miss: atmosphere, wait time, service, and food quality.

Written by Ana Canas McPeek

There are so many restaurants out there, but where to eat? If you’re a food lover like me and love to try different cuisine, you might consider this low-key Vietnamese restaurant, Pho TJ, located in Brighton on Bridge Street. Open for more than five years with 4.7 star average on Google reviews, this pho noodle restaurant is a place for workers around the area like me who want to get a quick lunch. You will be guaranteed an experience with good food and awesome service. We all have our reasons why we return to a restaurant, and I have 4 criteria that you won’t want to miss: atmosphere, wait time, service, and food quality.

When you walk in, you will be greeted by someone who will accompany you to your seat. They have red sofas for the booths, the middle is wooden chairs with black glass tables, and picture frames on their medium tone yellow-colored wall of flowers. It feels welcoming and warm inside, but, heads up, it gets too noisy during lunch and dinner. I don’t know what it is, but majority of their customers talk loudly.

People like me, who are always hungry, don’t like to wait in line just to be seated somewhere that has a lot of customers and is always packed during lunch. So far I’ve been seated right away. Last visit, there was a sign on the door that said they were understaffed, but that didn’t stop other customers and I from going in.

You want to go to a restaurant because you don’t have time to cook, you’re hungry, and you want fast and good service. They have excellent service; if you feel like going out for a quick lunch break you should try Pho TJ, you’ll be in and out within 20 minutes. They have good teamwork, you’ll get seated right away with a glass of water and a menu, and they’re ready to take your order. But since I have been their valued customer for a long time, and they already know what three foods I always order, the menu is not necessary.

The food doesn’t take long to arrive, and when you’re done you don’t have to wait for your bill; you can go to the counter and pay. Waiting for your bill where you’re seated is unnecessary, but it depends on when you want to pay. I just find it faster that way.

The food is delicious. My first favorite is the combination pho; it consists of rare steak, brisket, tendon, meatballs, tripe, and of course, the noodles, and costs $7.50. The broth does it all. The meats are very tender, meatballs and noodles are soft enough to chew; add cilantro, lemons and mint leaf with sriracha.

I wish they put a little bit more noodles without the additional charge of $1, because getting a combination pho itself is already another $1, but if you don’t mind paying extra for food, then go for it. Especially with their pho that is to die for; then it is all worth it.

My second favorite, the combination rice plate, costs $11.95. Grilled chicken, beef, pork, shrimp and egg rolls grilled enough that it’s not burned. It’s not too greasy; there’s just enough oil where there won’t be residue on your plate.

The meat is not tough, egg rolls are very crunchy, and of course my holy rice (I call it holy because I can’t live without eating rice once a day.) is cooked just the way I want it. It doesn’t look like porridge, not soggy, not hard, just tender enough to chew that it makes me want more.

Last,but not least, is a special request; the grilled chicken and pork rice plate. Since they don’t have this on their menu, I pay a little bit extra for a price of $13. Basically it’s the combination rice plate, but without the rest of the meat.

Just like everyone else, I am very picky with the places I want to eat at, so if a restaurant gives me a highly-satisfying experience, I’ll keep coming back. That is what Pho TJ provides, and they strive hard to keep their customers happy. I would give Pho TJ five stars and advise you to come and visit if you’re in the Brighton area.

PHO TJ

Infobox

Address: 702 E Bridge St, Brighton, CO 80601

Phone number: (303) 659-2728

Hours: 11 a.m. – 9 p.m. Monday -Saturday

Cuisine: Vietnamese Noodle House

Price Average: Appetizer $2.95-9.50, Entrée $8.95-$11.95

Grade: 5 stars

Changing a Lifetime With the Fitness Center

Written by Drew Lascot and Joe Fisk

Photos by Lindsay Brand

At FRCC, a variety of resources are available to students: the Pantry offers food to all who apply, the Writing Center gives advice on papers ranging from essays to resumes, and the Game Room is available for recreation. The High Plains Fitness Center is a free gym available to all students. It only requires a Wolf Card from the Student Life Office (for a $5 fee) and filling out a registration form. Employee rates are $30 for the fall and spring semesters and $20 in the summer.

 

Written by Drew Lascot and Joe Fisk

Photos by Lindsay Brand

At FRCC, a variety of resources are available to students: the Pantry offers food to all who apply, the Writing Center gives advice on papers ranging from essays to resumes, and the Game Room is available for recreation. The High Plains Fitness Center is a free gym available to all students. It only requires a Wolf Card from the Student Life Office (for a $5 fee) and filling out a registration form. Employee rates are $30 for the fall and spring semesters and $20 in the summer.

Those unsure where to start their fitness journey may find interest in the group fitness classes offered Monday through Thursday. All group fitness courses are an hour long, with the exception of meditation and mindfulness, which runs only 30 minutes.

The new Health and Wellness Coordinator, Lauren Schiller, is at least partially responsible for the variety of classes available. Before being hired in September, only three group fitness courses were offered.  In the future, Schiller hopes to implement a variety of wellness programs that appeal to a wide spectrum of students. It’s Schiller’s hope that all students can leave with healthy habits for the future.

“[I want to bring] just other things to get students more active and be able to appeal to different people, so not just the athletic type,” said Schiller.“I want there to be something for everybody, ‘cause that’s what I think fitness is. During these critical college years, this is the time where people start creating habits, that’s when I started creating them. We’re setting students up for success in their future, and I enjoy that aspect.”

The group fitness class Women on Weights was created by Sydney True, the only group fitness instructor who is also a student. Between work and instructing, True is often in the fitness center.

Although there are many group fitness courses, clubs, and regulars, there is still plenty of room for students who are new to the gym.

“It’s not to the point where it’s overcrowded, where you can’t get on the machines or anything, like so many other gyms,” said True.

The fitness center has multiple rooms and equipment that are free to students with a Wolf Card: a cardio room, weight room, basketball court, and yoga studio. True believes it has even more to offer.

“It doesn’t just better you physically,” said True. “It betters you mentally and emotionally, I think.”

Clubs, like dodge ball, and intramural sports on offer, such as volleyball, provide a different way to break a sweat. Of course, those already familiar with a gym’s layout who are just looking to get in a workout are welcome too.

Being free is only part of it; community, Schiller thinks, is key in getting people to enjoy their time. In room B0504, Schiller keeps an open-door policy, welcoming anyone interested in starting or maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

 

Captain Marvel Movie Review

Captain Marvel: Movie Review

Written by Matt Cunningham

Ever since Iron Man was released in 2008, the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) has shown film’s capability to bring enormous groups of people together. Regardless of the discussions surrounding ‘superhero fatigue,’ Marvel has shown time and time again that they can sell out mass amounts of theaters around the world.

Written by Matt Cunningham

Ever since Iron Man was released in 2008, the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) has shown film’s capability to bring enormous groups of people together. Regardless of the discussions surrounding ‘superhero fatigue,’ Marvel has shown time and time again that they can sell out mass amounts of theaters around the world.

The 21st movie in the MCU, Captain Marvel was released on March 7. It was directed by Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck, who have both been involved in projects such as It’s Kind of a Funny Story, Half Nelson, and Mississippi Grind. The biggest budget of these three films is It’s Kind of a Funny Story at $8 million. Moreover, it is a risky choice to give the blockbuster budget of $152 million to these directors.

The film is Marvel’s first female-led adventure, as it stars Brie Larson (Short Term 12, Room, and Kong: Skull Island). Other actors in the film include Samuel L. Jackson (Pulp Fiction, The Hateful Eight, Jurassic Park, and Glass) and Ben Mendelsohn (Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, Ready Player One, and The Dark Knight Rises).

This movie is Captain Marvel’s first appearance in the MCU. Naturally, it’s treated as an origin story for the character. She is shown working as a soldier for the Krees, a militarily and technologically advanced alien race. However, she eventually finds her way to Earth in the 1990’s and gets caught in the middle of a war between the Krees and the Skrulls. The Skrulls are also an advanced alien race that can shape shift into any object or person they have seen with their eyes. While on Earth, Captain Marvel uncovers her past and finds out how powerful she can be.

Marvel’s formula has proven to be entertaining, and this film certainly provides spurts of entertainment throughout its runtime. Dazzling 3D and CGI effects make the action sequences a dose of popcorn-movie fun. A scene involving Captain Marvel fighting a bunch of spaceships showed off the capabilities of 3D effects. There are no headache-inducing quick-cuts during the fight scenes, and it is fairly easy to determine what is going on.

Larson relishes the action scenes, as her quips and taunts towards the enemy left the audience laughing on a number of occasions. For example, when she is escaping a Skrull laboratory, she has two large pieces of metal stuck to her arm. Before she uses her powers to beat up the soldiers, she sarcastically asks, “Hey, you wouldn’t happen to know how to get these off would ‘ya? No? Okay.”

However, Larson struggled in the more serious scenes. When there wasn’t an action set piece being thrown at the screen, she failed to convey a sense of emotion when it was needed. This left a lot to be desired in the narrative, because it was easy for my mind to drift during essential character moments. The writers handled her backstory with a lot of brief flashback sequences, which harmed the character development. She begins the movie as a stoic warrior and ends the movie as a more powerful stoic warrior.

Jackson steals almost every scene that he is on screen for. He plays Nick Fury, an agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (Strategic Hazard Intervention Espionage Logistics Directorate). Fury has been in a few of the previous MCU films, such as The Avengers. Jackson has tremendous chemistry with Larson, and every time the script requires him to be funny, he delivers. From his hysterical tone of voice towards Goose the Cat to his “C’mon man!” reactions, it is nearly impossible to envision anyone else playing this role.  The de-aging CGI work on Jackson is praiseworthy, because it is nearly unnoticeable.

The villains are not menacing in the movie, because of the wasted opportunities with the idea. The war between the Skrulls and the Krees is about something previously seen in the MCU. I would have liked to see something original causing the war to take place. The Skrulls are only shown doing their shape-shifting a couple of times throughout the movie. During a chase sequence on a train, the Skrulls trick our protagonists by becoming ordinary people and using surprise attacks while undercover. This is easily the most memorable scene from the film, and I wish that this ability was used far more frequently.

It seemed as if the writers were more concerned with making ‘90s references, because it takes place in the ‘90s. Captain Marvel crashes into Blockbuster Video, she is told to get a communicator at Radio Shack, and she wears grunge clothing throughout much of the film. Most of the soundtrack features music from the decade, including grunge and pop. While most of the nostalgia in the film is played for comedy, it relied a bit too heavily on it for my taste.

Captain Marvel is not a revolutionary film that will change film making for years to come. However, it is still a good time at the movies that will keep you entertained for the majority of the two-hour run time. There are a mix of positives and negatives, but I was still left smiling by the end of it. I am more excited than ever for Avengers: Endgame, because of the setup this film created for it. I’ll give Captain Marvel a B-.

Japon Restaurant Review

Written by Maggie Hoskins

Illustration by Madison Otten

If you love trying new sushi as much as I do, then you might enjoy Japon. I have tried over a handful of different sushi places since I moved here, and I have found myself returning to Japon over and over. The restaurant, which recently fell into new ownership, has been around for many years. They are a cozy and clean place, serving fresh, authentic Japanese cuisine, and always make me feel welcome and taken care of each time I visit. They have a convenient location at 4880 W. 120th Ave. in a little strip mall, making it very easy to get to with plenty of close parking. I will rate them based on their attentive service, fresh tasting food, and reasonable prices.

Written by Maggie Hoskins

Illustration by Madison Otten

If you love trying new sushi as much as I do, then you might enjoy Japon. I have tried over a handful of different sushi places since I moved here, and I have found myself returning to Japon over and over. The restaurant, which recently fell into new ownership, has been around for many years. They are a cozy and clean place, serving fresh, authentic Japanese cuisine, and always make me feel welcome and taken care of each time I visit. They have a convenient location at 4880 W. 120th Ave. in a little strip mall, making it very easy to get to with plenty of close parking. I will rate them based on their attentive service, fresh tasting food, and reasonable prices.

You never wait around for service at Japon. The host is quick to greet you before walking you to the table of choice. Or you can sit at the sushi bar and watch as they make sushi and sashimi. I have been many times now, and I always get the same smiling server. She immediately brings over a glass of water and sets down the menus giving me a few moments to decide. I typically order an appetizer while I am deciding which sushi roll I am in the mood for. She quickly brings out my appetizer; by then, I have made my decision. She places my order, and before I can finish my gyoza or my crab cheese wontons, my sushi is set on the table in front of me. I’m always shocked at how quick they are with the food.

Though service is fast, it still tastes like they have spent all day making the food perfect just for you. I have tried both the pork and the vegetable gyoza and was not disappointed with either. They are served with a sweet dipping sauce that perfectly complements these stuffed dumpling-like puffs. The crab cheese wontons are some of the best I have ever had, perfectly fried and crispy and stuffed with creamy crab filling. They are so good you don’t even need to dunk them in the sauce, but it enhances the wontons with a burst of sweet and sour flavor.

When deciding on which sushi roll I want, I always try to pick something different. From deep-fried to tempura-fried to the fresh-eel style, I have yet to be let down. I like my sushi to taste fresh, unlike King Soopers sushi that sits out all day. They have an extensive variety of different rolls to choose from. From a basic California roll to a hand-rolled spicy salmon roll to a tempura-fried crazy roll, there is something to appease everyone. My favorite go-to roll is the Broncos roll. Salmon, cream cheese, and avocado all deep fried, topped with masago mayo and eel sauce, and then baked to perfection. Served warm, you need to let it cool for a minute or two before indulging yourself.

Sushi can get expensive and out of hand easily. The prices at Japon are fair, no more and no less than your average sushi place. They offer a reasonable lunch menu with reasonable pricing. It has all your basic sushi rolls such as California roll, Vegas roll, L.A. roll, vegetable roll, tuna roll, etc., and you won’t spend more than $10 to $12.  If you want the special rolls, which typically I do, they are just a bit more. The Bronco roll is amongst the cheaper options at only $8.95, but others can average up to $14.95. The crab cheese wontons are $4.95, whereas the gyoza are $5.50. Depending on if you decide to indulge in a $4 beer or not, the bill will average anywhere from $13 to $20 and occasionally up to $30 to $40 for 2 people. Not too bad for sushi and an appetizer and the occasional beer or two.

With consistent, exceptional service; fresh and authentic food; a clean, pleasant dining experience; and practically no wait time, I rate Japon with an A. Whether you are dining for one and in a hurry, going out for a date night, or looking for a place to take the family, Japon will not disappoint. If you are trying sushi for the first time or have tried every roll under the sun, there is something on the menu for everyone. Don’t be afraid to try something new; it may turn out to be your new favorite!

INFOBOX

Grade: A

Address: 4880 W. 120th Ave, #200 Westminster, CO 80020

Hours: 11 a.m to 9:30 p.m Monday to Thursday, 11 a.m to 10 p.m Friday to Sunday; 4 p.m to 9 p.m Sunday

Food: Japanese

Price: $2.50-$6.50 appetizers; $5.50- $14.95 sushi rolls; $12.95-$29.95 entrees; $49.95-$199.95 specials

Noise Level: Moderate

Information: 303-460-8868

Sydney True, Women’s Weights

Written By Joe Fisk

Photo By Lindsey Brand

FRCC student, Sydney True, created the Women’s on Weights class. She’s the only student instructing a fitness class and has been doing it for  three semesters now. The class is free to students and meets Tuesdays and Thursdays from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the fitness center.

 

Written By Joe Fisk

Photo By Lindsey Brand

FRCC student, Sydney True, created the Women’s on Weights class. She’s the only student instructing a fitness class and has been doing it for  three semesters now. The class is free to students and meets Tuesdays and Thursdays from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the fitness center.

True pursues a degree in business, as well as studying for a personal training certification. As the Women’s Weights instructor, she provides experience and knowledge. True has been involved with fitness her whole life.

“As a kid I was always in sports,” said True. “I was a soccer player and a cheerleader.”

She enjoyed dance and was raised with insight from her father, Olympic weightlifter Harry Lee True. He motivated her, taught her techniques, and instilled values in her that she applied inside and outside of the gym. Most important, he taught her to never quit.

“He always told me, ‘Once a quitter, always a quitter,’” said True. “I know that sounds harsh, but in a sense it’s true… Physically, it’s hard. Mentally, it’s hard. But you are capable.”

With a background in fitness and motivation from her father, True was inspired by a friend who introduced her to weightlifting. After lifting together, True hoped to bring a similar sense of community to FRCC.

 “About two years ago I started getting into weightlifting from a friend,” said True. “Ever since then it’s grown as a passion. I wanted to take that and bring it here.”

True’s favorite part of instructing is the opportunity to teach a lifelong skill. The lesson doesn’t stop after the class and the skills learned in class can be shared with others.

“I like teaching something that they can use for the rest of their lives and skills they can put towards themselves,” said True. “They may be able to take from me and show somebody else, too.”

Over the three semesters True has been instructing the class, some regulars have made a habit of going every week. However, this is not required, as the class has a “drop-in” style. The class utilizes the fitness center’s variety of equipment, utilizing exercises tailored to challenge all levels of gym experience.

“I’ll do basic skills that pertain to the motor skills you already know, and I’ll put in some things that are more advanced,” said True. “It caters to beginning and advanced people in the gym. There’s still plenty of equipment and space for everyone. And it’s not all cardio and weights; we also have a yoga studio for those who like to stretch or to dance.”

The fitness center is a free resource for all students. You will need a Wolf Card and can join by signing a waiver that can be found at the fitness center front desk. Information on fitness classes, including Women on Weights, can also be found here.

“The hardest part is starting, but it’s very beneficial, very rewarding,” said True. “So never be afraid to ask me any questions. Especially when it comes to fitness.”  

Deciding a Snow Day

Written by Matt Cunningham

Photo By Ezra Eckman

Snow was coming down quickly and heavily. Cars were fishtailing all over the icy roads as the temperature seemed to continue to drop rapidly. This was the case on Jan. 28, as FRCC attempted to make a difficult decision: keep the school open or shut down for the day.

Written by Matt Cunningham

Photo By Ezra Eckman

Snow was coming down quickly and heavily. Cars were fishtailing all over the icy roads as the temperature seemed to continue to drop rapidly. This was the case on Jan. 28, as FRCC attempted to make a difficult decision: keep the school open or shut down for the day.

There are a number of factors that go into determining if the school will shut down for the day due to severe weather. As long as the school remains open, students will not receive excused absences for missing classes because of the weather.

“If I’m already paying money to attend this community college, I don’t want to have to worry about severe weather affecting my safety.” said student Nick Eichner.

Eichner thought that his money should go towards “making snowy weather on campus an easy task to deal with.”

Cathy Pellish is vice president of the Westminster campus, College Hill Library, and Brighton campus. Her responsibilities extend to setting up arrangements for snowy days on campus.  

According to Pellish, the most important part of the decision making process is, “having our facility and security teams on campus very early to assess conditions, clear snow, and get the building open, which is the ultimate goal.” This allows for the sidewalks to be cleared for students, allowing for easier access to the building.

“The decision to close or delay opening is made by college leadership, including the president,” said Pellish, “We try to choose times to have the least impact on everyone.”

The school has a careful process to make sure that it is safe for students on campus during severe weather.

“For example, college leadership (president, vice presidents, campus safety personnel and public relations personnel) meet by phone at 5:30 a.m. when considering a full day closure or a delayed opening,” said Pellish.

So far, the snow has caused the school’s hours to change twice this semester. On Feb. 7, the school had an early closing at 4 p.m. The next day, the school dealt with a delayed start at 10 a.m.

“Since many of our evening classes begin at 5:30 p.m., we try to make a decision no later than 4 p.m.” said Pellish. This decision is made earlier, because the evening classes start at 5 p.m.

Colorado’s weather is unpredictable, and FRCC is working towards making days with severe weather a safer experience for its students. Students like Eichner feel a bit uneasy about the process, but the school is looking to make it as easy as possible for everyone. Students are able to sign up for emergency texts from the college on the FRCC website, which provides to-the-minute updates that will make the decision the school is making a bit clearer.  

March Lockdown, What You Should Know

Written by Ezra Ekman

Photo by Ezra Ekman

With increased frequency of security events across the country, FRCC has instituted lockout and lockdown procedures for the safety and security of students, faculty, and staff. On March 4, 5, or 6, Westminster campus will have a lockdown drill.

Written by Ezra Ekman

Photo by Ezra Ekman

 

With increased frequency of security events across the country, FRCC has instituted lockout and lockdown procedures for the safety and security of students, faculty, and staff. On March 4, 5, or 6, Westminster campus will have a lockdown drill.

 

John VanZandt, Supervisor of Campus Security and Preparedness, explained what to expect during a drill.  

 

“A lockout is performed when the problem is outside of the building,” said VanZandt. “A lockdown is initiated when the problem is inside the building.  In a lockout, it’s business as usual inside.”

 

For both lockout and lockdown drills, announcements will be made over the internal and external PA system. During the lockout drill a message will repeat; ‘A lockout is in effect, remain inside, this is a drill.’

 

“They can expect a normal lockdown drill to last 10 to 15 minutes,” VanZandt said.  “In a real event, a lockdown could last for hours. For drill purposes, once we (security) have swept through the building, they will hear an ‘all clear’ that the drill is complete.  They’ll hear that 3 to 4 times over the loudspeakers. It will also pop up on all computers that are connected to the network.”

In a lockout situation VanZandt’s team would man the doors and prevent anyone entering or exiting the building, but regular business would proceed within the school until further notice.

 

“ An example of a lockout situation would be a law enforcement event taking place near the campus and we want to ensure everyone in the building doesn’t leave the building and interject themselves into a potential problem,” said VanZandt. “ The problem is outside the building and we want to keep it there.”

 

A lockdown occurs when someone in the building could potentially cause harm to people, campus security and law enforcement then deals with the event.  If you’re near an exit during a lockdown, get out and leave campus. If you’re not VanZandt says to get the the closest room and lock the door, turn off lights, turn off electronics, find a hiding place, and remain silent. He summarizes it as locks, lights, out of sight.

 

A fire alarm during a lockout or lockdown is a special case.  If a fire alarm goes off while in a lockdown, VanZandt recommends ignoring it.

 

“The reason is there have been some school shootings, and shootings in businesses, where they pulled the fire alarm to get everyone outside,” said VanZandt. “ The important thing to understand is that, if a fire alarm is pulled during a lockdown, that they stay put unless they feel, due to smoke or flame, that they have to leave.”

 

Around campus, the differences between the two types of events are sometimes unclear.

 

Oscar Alejandro Lejarazo Ventura, FRCC student said, “A lockout is when people aren’t allowed to enter or leave the building.  A lockdown is where you have to stay in the classroom.” He asked “Should I know anything else about a lockdown?”

 

Terrell Schlegel, a nearby student replied, “You should know what threat that actually means. So, a lockdown is there is a threat inside the building itself. They could be an armed individual or just someone who shouldn’t be there. A lockout is a threat out in the community or an event out in the community that could cause the student body harm. It’s different because one is a lot more real.”

 

All classrooms and departments have signs with instructions on such events as well. Campus Security encourages students, faculty, and staff to contact them with any questions or concerns.