Jack’s and Steamers Restaurant Review

Written by Emily Jackson

Illustration by Madison Otten

Are you looking for a family-friendly place to get a latte, eat a meal, have a drink, and get ice cream all in one stop?  Consider going to Jack’s and Steamers Bar & Grill. It’s a family-owned business that opened in 2007. The service can be hit or miss, but the restaurant has a friendly, warm atmosphere that’s a mix of a pub and a café.

 

Written by Emily Jackson

Illustration by Madison Otten

Are you looking for a family-friendly place to get a latte, eat a meal, have a drink, and get ice cream all in one stop?  Consider going to Jack’s and Steamers Bar & Grill. It’s a family-owned business that opened in 2007. The service can be hit or miss, but the restaurant has a friendly, warm atmosphere that’s a mix of a pub and a café.

The atmosphere of Jack’s and Steamers is unique. When you first walk in, you see the coffee and ice cream bar connected to the traditional bar and a staircase leading to an upstairs dining area, which also has a bar. They create a sense of community by selling locally-made jams and posting colorful artwork from the local elementary school.  There’s also a calendar made of small chalkboards on the wall, listing the restaurant’s specials and unique holidays like “Cook For Your Pet Day.”

The first time I went was on a Thursday night, and I was very disappointed with the service, but the second time I went was on a Friday morning, and I was pleased. The first time was with a friend, and the restaurant seemed somewhat busy.  It took about ten minutes for the hostess to notice us standing there, then we were brought to a table on the second floor.

Once we sat down, it took twenty minutes for our waitress to bring us water and introduce herself.  After we ordered, it took thirty minutes for our food to arrive. Our waitress didn’t return until she took the check. A chef from the kitchen brought our food, a different waiter gave us sauce for the sliders, and a busboy gave us our check. We spent two hours in the restaurant. an hour and half was spent waiting.  

The second time I went with my mom, and we were greeted as soon as we walked in the door.  We were brought to a table almost immediately and were greeted by our waiter in a few minutes. He came back periodically to check on us and gave us the food we ordered.  The service we received during the second visit gave me hope for the future.

The food on the second visit was better too. On the first visit I ordered the “Under Cover,” another name for their daily special.  That day it was Cordon Bleu Sliders ($12). The plate had three sliders and fries. Each slider consisted of a breaded piece of chicken, a very thin piece of ham, and a see-through piece of cheese. Then I noticed there was no sauce for the sliders; they were dry and eating them was like trying to chew cardboard.  My friend ordered “Jack’s Crabby” which were crab cake sliders ($12). The crab cakes were mostly made of breading and had tiny shrivels of crab in it. The cakes were dry and crumbled like sand. My friend also ordered a glass of red wine ($12), we were shocked when we saw the price.

On the second visit I ordered “The Gatherer,” which was scrambled eggs mixed with tomatoes, mushrooms, jack cheese, and spinach on top of “home fries,” which are diced fried potatoes.  “The Gatherer” also came with a side of green chili, apple spice jam, and toast ($9). The apple spice jam lessened the spice in the chili and created a strange but delicious flavor of spicy apples.  My mom ordered the “Benny,” which was a traditional eggs benedict ($10). The tart hollandaise sauce paired with the sweetness of the ham, the over-easy egg and English muffin.

Jack’s and Steamers also provided a variety of food.  They had multiple substitutes for gluten-free and vegetarian options, along with homemade ice cream and lattes. They also serve more traditional dishes like burgers, nachos, chicken parmesan, and meat loaf.  It was surprising to see the different homemade items they sold.

Overall, I was happier with my second visit. I am not sure how consistent the service is there since I had two drastically different experiences.  That’s why I give Jack’s and Steamers a B. I would advise not to sit on the second floor; it’s possible that could have contributed to the bad service during my first visit.

INFOBOX

Jack’s and Steamer’s

Grade: B

Address: 8565 Five Parks Dr.  #100, Arvada, CO 80005

Hours: Mon-Sun 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p. m.

Food: American

Average price: $10

Information: 303-456-7624

A Lower Tuition is Just a Few Hours Away

Written by Matt Cunningham

Illustration by Madison Otten

FRCC offers the Foundation Scholarship opportunity for its students. The application for this scholarship is open from Dec. 1 to March 1 each year. Students who apply complete a single application for all scholarships. The amounts typically range from $1,000 to $5,000 for full-time students and $500 to $1,000 for part-time students. That means this scholarship can help pay for a book or an entire class.

Written by Matt Cunningham

Illustration by Madison Otten

FRCC offers the Foundation Scholarship opportunity for its students. The application for this scholarship is open from Dec. 1 to March 1 each year. Students who apply complete a single application for all scholarships. The amounts typically range from $1,000 to $5,000 for full-time students and $500 to $1,000 for part-time students. That means this scholarship can help pay for a book or an entire class.

“It takes time to get people assigned to scholarships, which is why there is a March 1 deadline,” said Brent Edwards, financial aid advisor for the Westminster campus. This allows for the financial aid department to assign people to their scholarships.

Students seemed to be aware of FRCC’s scholarships, but not as knowledgeable about other ones, such as transfer scholarships at four year institutions. People should be aware that even partial scholarships can save hundreds to thousands of dollars. According to debt.org, there is 46 billion dollars given out in scholarships and grants each year.

“No, I do not know, nor do I know what scholarships I am qualified for,” said FRCC student Daniel Ethington. Though I do know the FRCC scholarship and what is required.”

There are plenty of opportunities for students to receive scholarship money. CollegeBoard.org has statistics that show, in the 2014 to 2015 school year, roughly two thirds of college students received aid from scholarships and grants. There are scholarships for students of all types. Whether one has a unique talent, the ability to write a strong essay, or a specific major, most students have the opportunity to at least get a partial scholarship. The steps required for scholarships usually take about a five to 15 hours, according to the site. So if a student wins $300, and it takes 10 hours to complete, that means that student made $30 an hour.

“I am aware of how much school can save you,” said FRCC student Cassi Lando, “Classes are expensive so every little bit helps. I feel like I do get a good amount of emails to keep me updated on specific scholarships offered at Front Range, but there are also many that I may not know about.”

“A high percentage of students [who apply] will be rewarded with the Foundation scholarship,” said Edwards. “However, the Colorado Merit scholarship is a 100 percent [award rate]  if you meet the requirements, and we have the funds.” The Colorado Merit Scholarship is a more difficult one to receive, because of the list of eligibility requirements. Students who apply for this scholarship must be a Colorado resident, enrolled in at least 9 credits per term, have a grade point average of 3.5 or higher, complete the FAFSA, meet all eligibility requirements for Federal Title IV aid, and must be an undergraduate student without a bachelor’s degree. This scholarship may have more requirements than others, but it can save students up to $750.

Scholarships require a lot of work from its applicants, but for students who are in need of financial aid, they can be a real lifesaver. The Foundation Scholarship is open until March 1, 2019 this year. If students need any help writing their scholarship essays, the Writing Center in the library is available to work with them at any time during the week. The link to apply for this can be found at FRCC Foundation Scholarship.

Lauren Schiller: Kids to Kinesiology

Written by Drew Lascot

Photo by Lindsay Brand

Walking into the office of the new Fitness and Wellness Coordinator, one is immediately greeted by the sign behind the desk: “Life is short. Don’t be lazy.” Lauren Schiller embodies this very quote, having found her new position at FRCC less than a year after graduating with her masters.

 

Written by Drew Lascot

Photo by Lindsay Brand

Walking into the office of the new Fitness and Wellness Coordinator, one is immediately greeted by the sign behind the desk: “Life is short. Don’t be lazy.” Lauren Schiller embodies this very quote, having found her new position at FRCC less than a year after graduating with her masters.

Hailing from Wyoming, Schiller had an affinity for Colorado for quite some time; visiting Denver with her friends wasn’t uncommon before she moved.

“I’ve always seen myself living in Colorado,” said Schiller. “‘Cause being from Wyoming, we’d come down for weekend trips and hang out in Denver. I’ve always loved it down here; there’s always so much to do, and the weather’s beautiful. A lot less windy than Wyoming.”

Schiller attended Casper College for two years, then University of Wyoming to finish out her bachelor’s and earn her master’s in kinesiology and health, but that wasn’t always her aspiration. Growing up, Schiller had a plethora of interests: basketball star, veterinarian, optometrist, but one always stuck out.

“I wanted to be a teacher,” said Schiller. “My mom’s a teacher, so I always thought I might get into that. I love kids and would love to work with them. I went to school for that at first, then as I got into the studies a little more, I decided that may not be the place for me to be.”

It was Schiller’s older sister studying the same kinesiology major that steered her college education toward the body. Fitness has always been a key quality of Schiller’s life, with sports playing a big part of her childhood.

“I played everything…” said Schiller. “Basketball was my big sport, soccer, volleyball, I played softball, did some track in high school.”

FIFA Women’s World Cup champion and Olympic gold medalist Mia Hamm was a big source of inspiration as a kid.

“I wouldn’t say I necessarily look up to athletes these days, but my family is still a big inspiration for me,” said Schiller. “My mom has always been a very strong woman and has always been there for me and has always supported me in everything that I’ve done, as well as my sisters. I’ve kind of taken the same path as her. [Schiller’s older sister] She’s in the healthcare field, she’s an occupational therapist, so she kind of does similar things to what I do, as far as exercise science things. I look up to her in that way, her and I have a lot of the same interests. I can go to her whenever I have questions on anything I might be questioning about the field.”

Schiller spent her summer of 2018 relaxing and doing part-time work with some full-time job searching, before applying for her current position. She’s now settling in, noting the friendly staff, and the benefits of working not far from home. Despite her healthy habits and the sign above her desk, she concedes that she does enjoy being lazy watching Netflix “like probably everyone else,” having seen Friends all the way through several times.

Open to any and all questions regarding health and fitness classes, Lauren Schiller can be found in her office on floor B, room B0504.

Great Scotts Eatery Restaurant Review

Written by Jonathan Ruiz

Diners are always my go-to when I’m in the mood to eat out. Each diner has its own feel to it and way of preparing food. We all know IHOP or Denny’s, but what about the small local diners? Great Scotts Eatery is one of the diners that gets overlooked, even though they have a huge sign at the side of U.S. Route 36.

Written by Jonathan Ruiz

Illustration by Madison Otten

Diners are always my go-to when I’m in the mood to eat out. Each diner has its own feel to it and way of preparing food. We all know IHOP or Denny’s, but what about the small local diners? Great Scotts Eatery is one of the diners that gets overlooked, even though they have a huge sign at the side of U.S. Route 36.

Great Scotts isn’t necessarily the easiest restaurant to access. With the restaurant being on the side of a highway, you have to take multiple back roads to find it. Newcomers can get lost maneuvering the dim streets. There’s street-side parking for the nearby businesses, making the road to Great Scotts narrow and nerve-wracking to drive down. With accessibility being fairly difficult, location is a 3.5 out of 5 stars. 

Upon entering, the atmosphere had a retro style of the ‘60s with a wall of records and old-school milkshake cups. Because it was November 2018, older Christmas music played. My boyfriend and I went around 8 p.m. It made the restaurant seem pretty slow, but it was way more packed the first time I visited with his family.

After standing in the front for only about 3 minutes, we were asked if we preferred a table or a booth, which is uncommon to be asked. For me, hosts just try to seat me wherever they can. As we were escorted to our booth, I noticed that there were a few dirty tables, and no bussers nearby. It took a long time before someone came to begin cleaning. We got one of the few clean booths. 4 out of 5 on the atmosphere itself.

My first order was an appetizer sampler with mozzarella sticks, onion rings, and loaded potatoes. The mozzarella sticks were crunchy on the outside with a nice stringy, melted cheese center. The onion rings also had a nice crunch to them and soft caramelization inside. The loaded potatoes were too dry for me but had a nice heap of melted cheese piled on top. If  they added some butter, it could moisten the potato.

The entrée I ordered was a cheeseburger named the Hang 10. You get a one-third pound beef patty with grilled pineapple on top, sweet Hawaiian cream cheese sauce, and a slice of pepper jack cheese. The beef patty was perfectly cooked and juicy. The sweet Hawaiian sauce added a lovely tang to the burger, mixing with the grilled pineapple and making it a wonderful sweet and salty explosion of flavors. The food was 4.5 out of 5; everything was delicious but the dry potatoes.

The service was exceptional. We were greeted with an ear-to-ear smile in our first interaction with an employee there. While being sat, our host engaged in conversation to ensure we were being treated kindly. After being sat, it took about 8 minutes for our waitress to come up and ask if we were ready for drinks. We put in our order and continued to look through our menus for our meals. As we were looking, another waitress checked in on us concerning our drinks. Our drinks arrived after 10 minutes. When we were ready we put in our order, our waitress provided helpful feedback for our choices. She recommended the Hang 10 and its delicious components, which made me excited. We waited 15 minutes for our food to come, which didn’t seem very long at all. While eating, our waitress checked in on us The waitress and the host created a friendly dining experience. Being treated wonderfully, service was 5 out of 5.

 I was treated terrifically, and the food was delicious. The location is pretty difficult to get to, and that might not be easily fixed, but more frequent bussing and adding butter to potatoes won’t hurt anyone. If those were improved on, Great Scotts could be a high-end diner. From all these evaluations, I can confidently give this restaurant a 4.5 out of 5 stars for an overall review.  If you are interested in some good diner food and some ‘60s nostalgia, stop on by Great Scotts.

 

Location: 1295 Cortez St, Denver, CO 80221

Hours: 24 hours

Cuisines: American Diner

Average Pricing:

$5-$10 (Appetizers)

$12-$20 (Entrees)

Contact Info: (303) 428-3558

Overall Evaluation: 4.5 out of 5 stars

Dean April Menzies, One of FRCC’s New Deans

Written by Matt Cunningham

Image by Ezra Ekman

Two new instructional deans were hired at the Westminster campus over Winter Break. April Menzies who has used her own personal experiences in life and education earn the title Dean Menzies.

 

Written by Matt Cunningham

Image by Ezra Ekman

Two new instructional deans were hired at the Westminster campus over Winter Break. April Menzies who has used her own personal experiences in life and education earn the title Dean Menzies.

Menzies earned her Ph.D. at Kansas State University. She began as an anthropology instructor at FRCC in 2006.

“I thought that [being an anthropology instructor] was too good to be true,” said Menzies.

Now, with 13 years of experience at the college, she has worked her way up to the dean position. This is vastly different than her childhood dream.

“I wanted to be an Olympic gymnast as a child. My favorite athlete as an adult is Simone Biles,” said Menzies.

As a kid, Menzies was able to see the World Elite Gymnast National Championship. This experience showed her that even professional athletes can make mistakes.

“I was able to see that even [they] are human, because I saw an elite gymnast fail mightily at the pole-vault,” Menzies said. ‘This taught me that regardless of where I am in life, I will have to continue to work hard.”

With much success in her educational career, Menzies offered some advice to aspiring educators at FRCC and beyond.

“Getting first-hand experience is the most important thing in education,” explained Menzies. “Making sure this is actually something you want to do and volunteering is very important.”

By the time Menzies was attending college for her educational degree, she knew that she did not want to be a traditional K-12 teacher, and that she wanted to be a part of higher education.

“I knew that I wanted to be involved in higher ed. I always appreciated what it had to offer.” said Menzies.

From a part-time instructor to one of the new instructional deans of the college, April Menzies shows that it’s possible for one to work their way up in the educational field. Her life lessons as a child contributed to her success, and she hopes to use them in her new job.

Dean Andrea DeCosmo, One Of FRCC’s New Deans

Written by Matt Cunningham

image by Ezra Ekman

FRCC’s new instructional dean Andrea DeCosmo’s path to becoming a dean involved a wealth of experience in higher education, the ability to learn challenging life lessons, and an extreme passion for education. DeCosmo started her new position on Jan. 7; she serves as the allied health dean for the Westminster campus and oversees the Brighton campus.

 

Written by Matt Cunningham

image by Ezra Ekman

FRCC’s new instructional dean Andrea DeCosmo’s path to becoming a dean involved a wealth of experience in higher education, the ability to learn challenging life lessons, and an extreme passion for education. DeCosmo started her new position on Jan. 7; she serves as the allied health dean for the Westminster campus and oversees the Brighton campus.

DeCosmo frequently coordinates with the other deans across all campuses on budgeting issues and the faculty hiring process. An instructional dean will typically indirectly interact with the students by ensuring their instructors are doing their jobs properly.

DeCosmo discussed the various responsibilities of a dean. There isn’t one set responsibility that deans have, as they are required to oversee a variety of moving parts.

“Pointing [faculty] in the right direction” is essential, according to DeCosmo. DeCosmo discussed the oversight of the budget, and how the deans have to manage “multiple pots of money.”

DeCosmo majored in mathematics to earn her bachelor’s degree at Saint Mary’s college in Indiana, then went on to the University of Missouri to earn her master’s degree in mathematics and education. She taught about every level of math imaginable, from elementary algebra to integrated math II. She has also worked for other community colleges in Tulsa, Okla.; Oak Lawn, Ind.; and Hudson Valley, N.Y.

The new dean at FRCC has lived in a number of places. She did a lot of her moving when she was a child, which caused a lot of uncertainty in her life. Growing up in Southwest Michigan, living in upstate New York, DeCosmo’s path to Colorado led her all around the country.

“It was not easy being taken away from my friends all the time,” said DeCosmo. “This all taught me how to work hard for everything.”

Her childhood still had plenty of positive moments. From sports with her father to family vacations, she managed to find abundant enjoyment as a kid.

“I remember watching the Chicago Bears games, sitting next to my dad as he explained the rules of football to me,” said DeCosmo.

However, Decosmo’s favorite childhood memory was “the family vacations to Cedar Point. I enjoyed riding Blue Streak and Gemini the most.”

DeCosmo has some strong opinions on education in the state of Colorado.

“We, as a state, don’t value education enough to fund it properly,” said Decosmo. “I would like to see more transparency in the state budget and promote our own citizens more.”

DeCosmo is new to the position, but her experience in education has led to a high-level status. She hopes to use her opinions on education and leadership to bring a fresh perspective to the dean position.

Family Movie Night

Written by Matt Cunningham  

As classes and college life  rolls along in the 2019 spring semester, FRCC continues to reach out to the community with various events. On Thursday, Feb. 7, the Westminster campus will have Family Movie Night in the Rocky Mountain Room at 6 p.m., featuring the movie Coraline, an animated dark fantasy adventure for all ages, based on the book by Neil Gaiman and directed by Henry Selick. Selick has collaborated with Tim Burton in the past with films like The Nightmare Before Christmas, and James and the Giant Peach.

 

Written by Matt Cunningham  

As classes and college life  rolls along in the 2019 spring semester, FRCC continues to reach out to the community with various events. On Thursday, Feb. 7, the Westminster campus will have Family Movie Night in the Rocky Mountain Room at 6 p.m., featuring the movie Coraline, an animated dark fantasy adventure for all ages, based on the book by Neil Gaiman and directed by Henry Selick. Selick has collaborated with Tim Burton in the past with films like The Nightmare Before Christmas, and James and the Giant Peach.

The event, organized by Student Life and co-sponsored by Comcast, will be an opportunity for students who may be too busy to socialize during the day to bring their families and mingle with the rest of the Front Range community. There will be complementary movie theater snacks available for everyone.

FRCC students can enter a drawing with the chance of winning a laptop, amongst other prizes. The prizes are a part of Comcast’s Internet Essentials program.

For further information on Family Movie Night, and other future events, make sure to contact the Student Life Office at (303) 404-5341 or in room C0560.