Caberet Night

By Melody Giles

On Oct. 25,  FRCC Westminster held its first-ever Cabaret Night. The event, put on by Front Range staff and students, had a packed house for its whimsy and diversity of music and art. The theme was love. Throughout the night, the audience was entertained with jazzy songs played on guitars, the piano, and by vocalists. There was also some dancing, a skit, and the emcee, Felicity Breanne, even told some jokes.

“I wanted to do something that was a) entertaining b) different and c) most important, something that focuses on the students and what they are doing.” said Dr. Kevin Garry, one of the music faculty who helped organize the event.

The room was filled with claps and cheers after every performance as the audience was being supportive and seemed to be soaking up every minute of the show.

“Honestly, the dancing was my favorite part,” said audience member Andy Correll.

But audience members didn’t just connect with the dancing.

“The singers were amazing,” Caitlin Hoskins and Lauren Milan both said.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Caberet Night Hosted at Westminster FRCC, Oct. 25, 7pm. Photos taken by Lindsey McKitrick. 

College Success Series:Networking Industry Contacts in College

Be sure to check out the previous College Success series articles, College Success Series Part 4: How to Take Exams.

By Ezra Ekman

As the saying goes, “it’s not what you know, but who you know that matters.”  Networking, getting to know people for possible future collaboration or to make industry contacts, is one of the most important aspects of college life.

Evan Kravitz, a career counselor in the Westminster Campus’ Career Success Center, is a proponent of many types of networking while still in college.  

“Every job I’ve gotten was because I talked to people,” said Kravitz.

But he insists you don’t have to be the world’s biggest socialite.

“If you feel you’re not good with conversation or you’re a little too shy, we work with students to be better at instigating conversations and keep the conversations going,” said Kravitz.

Kravitz recommends informational interviews, which are meetings with professionals in your desired industry to ask questions and learn more about them.

“The thing about informational interviews is they’re not job interviews,” says Kravtiz. “You aren’t jeopardizing getting a job; you’re just having a conversation with someone who’s career perspective could greatly influence the decisions you make academically and career-wise.”

Online networking is another useful strategy. The Career Success Center hosts LinkedIn workshops to teach students how to build their LinkedIn profiles. Kravitz sees LinkedIn as an excellent icebreaker.

“Before you even meet with someone, you can have an email exchange where you’re laying the groundwork for the informational interview,” said Kravitz. “I heavily encourage students to get on LinkedIn.”

Make sure you have a decent photo for your profile.

“It’s not like Facebook where you can post a picture chugging a beer,” said Kravitz. “If you can’t get a professional headshot, just use a selfie. Those profiles with pictures attached get more views.”

The Career Success Center also offers other benefits beyond LinkedIn workshops. They will help you build and analyze your resume, write a cover letter, and even give you some professional clothing for job interviews.

It all starts now, according to Kravitz.

“Push yourself to come out of your shell,” said Kravitz. “If you’re not a social person or have been labeled an introvert, those aren’t horrible labels. But in college, you really need to start reaching out to people and start networking. College doesn’t last forever. If you’ve done no networking and talked to no one, you’ll be starting from scratch. But if you network, you’ll have several contacts that will keep you in mind.”

The connections you make today become professional contacts you use after graduation. Knowing someone can be the difference between landing an interview or your resume not being seen. Getting social, network, and set yourself up for success.

College Success Series Part 4: How to Take Exams

Exams are something that all students dread. But there are ways to manage the stress.

By Ezra Ekman

Exams are something that all students dread. But there are ways to manage the stress.

Before exams, take advantage of on-campus programs. The Academic Success Center offers free, individual tutoring and tutor-led study sessions with no sign-up requirements. Subjects include math, biology, humanities, and English, but they encourage students of other subjects to apply. The Math Lab and Writing Center each offer free, walk-in assistance. There are also first-come, first serve study rooms on B level under Student Life, in the library, and in the Student Organization Center (SOC).

On exam days, arrive early, and don’t try to memorize details at the last minute. Spend 30 to 60 minutes before to “relax.” Eat a light snack to keep yourself alert but not a heavy meal to avoid drowsiness. Student Life often offers free snacks and a place in the SOC during finals for a quiet place to relax and collect your thoughts.

It sounds hokey, but it can be very helpful to create the right mindset for an exam. Ten minutes before the exam, take a moment to remind yourself of the following:

 

    • You’ve prepared well for this test
    • You know the material.
    • You can and will do well.
    • You refuse to get nervous over just one exam.
    • You are relaxed and ready.

 

The Academic Success Center has some additional insight to help students succeed in preparation for exams:

  1. Start with a brain dump: write down any formulas at the beginning, so you can recall them during more stressful parts of the test.
  2. Remember to breathe! Studies show that people hold their breath when stressed. Breathing normally can help you remain calm.
  3. Don’t be afraid to ask instructors for clarification; they can’t answer the question but can clarify what it means.
  4. Read each question before looking at the answers, then read each answer thoroughly before answering. If you don’t see the right answer, pause and remember what you do know about it. Recall any notes, sketches, or mind maps you’ve made.
  5. Answer easier questions first; they give clues to more difficult questions. Spend more time on higher-point-value questions than on lower ones. They may appear later in the test; consider this when budgeting time for each answer.
  6. Use the process of elimination to narrow your choices. Look for key words like always, sometimes, never, most, some, all, none, is, and is not. If answers don’t match key words, you can safely eliminate it. Don’t guess unless there’s nothing left to eliminate.
  7. Only change answers you absolutely know are incorrect. Once you answer, verify it was what you intended, then leave it alone unless you find a later question giving clues to earlier ones.
  8. For essay questions, imagine describing concepts to a 6 year old. “Explaining” a concept can jog your memory. For definitions, give a book explanation of the topic and include descriptions of why something is an example. If questions have multiple pieces, ensure that you answer each one, especially with essay answers. You can lose points if you miss any question parts!
  9. Don’t make assumptions about answer structure. Just because answers are a specific option (A, B, C, D, true, false, etc.) multiple times doesn’t mean that’s wrong. Sometimes you’ll answer “A” three times in a row. It looks strange, but it happens.
  10. Check the backs of pages to ensure you don’t miss any answers. I almost handed in an exam with half the answers missing!

You’ve prepared well. You know the material. You are ready and relaxed. You can and WILL do well!

 

Moon EP by Alison Sudol Review

Alison blurs the line between multiple genres such as indie folk and indie pop. Her new EP features the title track “Moon”, and four other original songs that she wrote. Each of the songs on the EP are very similar to each other, as this album was vastly disappointing to me.

By Matt Cunningham

Alison Sudol is an up and coming singer and songwriter who released her new EP, Moon on Friday, Nov 2. Sudol is also playing the role of Queenie Goldstein in the new film Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald.

In her music, she blurs the line between multiple genres such as indie folk and indie pop. Her new EP features the title track Moon”, and four other original songs that she wrote. Each of the songs on the EP are very similar to each other, as this album was vastly disappointing to me.

alison sudol

Moon by Alison Sudol, released November 2.

Sudol clearly has some talent, as the tracks are lyrically strong and easy to memorize after a few listens. Some of her skills on the piano are on display throughout the EP, Sudol may be more suited for being a piano player in a band or for an orchestral score in a film. Her vocals on the EP is what made five songs seem like an eternity.  She sounds very screechy and high-pitched to an uncomfortable extent. This sadly makes for an unpleasant listening experience that is more angering than relaxing.

As a songwriter, it is extremely difficult to make quality music. There is a minimal amount of musical artists who make enough money to support themselves. Sudol needs to find her niche, as it sadly is not being a lead vocalist on a solo project or with a band of any kind.  She sounds off-key on the entire EP. Her voice seems to be echoing in an empty room.She seems to constantly be at a high-pitched tone throughout the five songs, and she doesn’t show much vocal range in any of the songs.

If you’re a gigantic fan of indie music, then you might find some enjoyment on the EP. Other than some skills being flexed on the piano, most of the album features some poorly done electronic beats. I hope to see Sudol use her piano abilities in something else in the future. For this EP, it is the only positive on an extremely weak series of songs. The music seems to have come from a place of pain for Sudol, and I respect the emotional aspect behind the lyrics.

“Moon unaware that you’re wanted. Moon unaware that you move” shows strength in songwriting for Sudol, because of her ability to use her life experiences and express it in a song.    

In a year with so many stellar albums, EPs and songs, Moon will not be something I will return to any time soon. Sudol shows potential across the 23 minutes of music, but this is just a beginner’s step towards other things. As a supporter of many small artists, it pains me to give Alison Sudol – Moon a two out of ten.

FRCC Halloween Costume Contest

Wednesday, Oct. 31 saw a lot of activity on the FRCC campus. Various events filled the day such as the Halloween party in the SOC and the Halloween lecture in the Rocky Mountain Room. However, the main event was the costume contest held by the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society that lasted from 1-2 p.m.

Wednesday, Oct. 31 saw a lot of activity on the FRCC campus. Various events filled the day such as the Halloween party in the SOC and the Halloween lecture in the Rocky Mountain Room. However, the main event was the costume contest held by the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society that lasted from 1-2 p.m.

Located in the Rotunda, the costume contest had its fair share of popularity among the rest of the ongoing events that day. It started with a cast of judges and contestants raring to get the competition going.

Nick Eichner, who sported an Army officer uniform, won first place amongst his peers.

“It feels great that I won,” said Eichner. “I didn’t think I was going to. I thought ‘what the heck, I’m right here, let’s have fun with it.’ So, I got dragged into it [participating in the contest] with everyone else in the game room, and we all thought it would be fun.”

Likewise, the organizers of the event had the same thoughts with the results.

“This is the first time we’ve done this kind of thing,” said Julia Petteway of Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society regarding the launch of the contest. “It was fun and went pretty well! I think we might make it a tradition.”

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Photos by Conrad Sperosen 

Bringing the Weird and Dead to Life

On Oct. 18, FRCC, the English Department, Student Life, and the Westminster Public Library put on the second annual Bringing the Weird and Dead to Life Author Panel

By Melody Giles

On Oct. 18, FRCC, the English Department, Student Life, and the Westminster Public Library put on the second annual Bringing the Weird and Dead to Life Author Panel. For the event local authors Mario Acevedo, Stephen Graham Jones, Molly Tanzer, and Carrie Vaughn came and answered questions about their books and writing styles, giving aspiring authors an idea of what to do and what to expect.

As you walked into the Cafe Rotunda, there were balloons, Halloween decorations and candy spread out across each table. Off to the side, Boulder Book Store sold books from each author, and in the back there was food.

After the Q&A, audience members had the opportunity to meet the authors and get books signed.

20181018_194321

“I loved this event because it gave me a chance to socialize and hear from other authors,” said student Elizabeth Loos.

“It’s a good outreach and a little bit of paying it forward, getting to talk to other writers,” said Author Carrie Vaughn. “When I was an up-and-coming writer, it was important to meet writers and know it was a possible thing to do. So that’s something I like to do, is come out and talk to writer and people who are interested in writing.”

20181018_195532Photos by Lindsey Brand

Hispanic Heritage Month

Hispanic Heritage Month was established 50 years ago on Aug. 17, 1968, by President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded by Ronald Reagan. This celebration lasted from Sept. 15 until Oct. 15,  and FRCC was a part of a multitude of institutions across the country that played host in celebration of the month.                                                                                                                                     

By Madison Otten

Hispanic Heritage Month was established 50 years ago on Aug. 17, 1968, by President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded by Ronald Reagan. This celebration lasted from Sept. 15 until Oct. 15,  and FRCC was a part of a multitude of institutions across the country that played host in celebration of the month.                                                                                                                                     

Melanie Rocha, involvement coordinator of Student Life at FRCC, organized the month of events.

“I want to let people and students know that Student Life cares,” said Rocha. “ I want to bring out the positives of the culture.”

Rocha wanted the Hispanic and Latin American communities to feel welcome and appreciated during a time of tense political discord. She wanted the students to feel grounded by celebrating their history.

Slam Poetry

On Tuesday, Sept. 18, the Rotunda was home to Franklin Cruz, an accomplished slam poet who has won multiple awards with adult slam groups and performed at universities across Colorado.

2018-09-18-Poetry-Slam-023

Franklin Cruz performs slam poetry for students, faculty, and staff in the Rotunda at Front Range Community College in Westminster, Colo on September 18, 2018. Photo by Ezra Ekman.

“Art is the great equalizer, regardless of where you come from or your culture,” said Cruz. “We all are storytellers. Creativity is tied to culture; art helps you identify with your culture, but you really have to know yourself.”

Cruz’s poetry ranged from his struggle with identity and sexuality to his father’s hardships as an immigrant worker. Cruz also did freestyle, where audience members called out random words, and he created a poem on the spot.  

 

2018-09-18-Poetry-Slam-168

Franklin Cruz performs slam poetry for students, faculty, and staff in the Rotunda at Front Range Community College in Westminster, Colo on September 18, 2018. Photo by Ezra Ekman.

 

Mitos y Leyendas; Myths and Legends Lunch and Learn

On Tuesday, Oct. 2 the Snowy Peaks Room was home to a presentation on the multitude of folklore figures from Central and South America such as El Cuco. The legends were gathered from a variety of regions, from Central America, South America, Mexico, and the Southwestern United States.

Mindy Kinnaman, director of Student Life, was the one who researched and presented for the lunch and learn. Kinnaman presented mainstream and historical tales. Most of the figures came from morality tales or explanatory idioms. At the end of the presentation, the audience shared their own ghost stories.

History of the Tortilla

Outside the SOC on Wednesday, Oct. 3, two tables were set up, a poster board was decorated with the history of the corn and flour tortillas and masa, which was developed by the Mayans and Aztecs around 10,000 B.C.

“People fear what they don’t understand,” said John Rocha, assistant director of advising. “Learning about something new can build the bridge to understanding.”

Students who wanted a tortilla were given a bag of flour masa they could then roll into shape. The masa was then cooked on a small stove and then served.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Photos by Conrad Sperosen

History of the Denver Chicano Movement with Dusti Gurule

On Thursday, Oct. 11 in the Rotunda Dusti Gurule, executive director of Colorado Organization for Latina and Reproductive Rights (COLOR), spoke about the 1960’s Chicano civil rights  movement, which fought for education, voting rights, and land restoration for Mexican Americans.

“I think knowing and understanding history and being proud to identify with your culture,” said Gurule. “For young people, it’s critical to know your roots; it can get you through tough times. It’s about being comfortable in your own skin; for me it was rooted in Chicano history.”

After Gurule finished speaking, the students were invited to go outside to and break a pinata that resembled Apollo the wolf.

October is a month of midterms and projects, but it is also a month for festivities and lore. Hispanic Heritage ended with the dismantling of a pinata but it was only the beginning of something new. Rocha looks to the future and plans to host another Hispanic Heritage month next year as FRCC continues to celebrate the heritage and culture of its diverse student community.